"Spirit of the Revolution"

by Frederick Stymetz Lamb

Part 2

Left panel detail of

Spirit of the Revolution

Frederick Stymetz Lamb

Right panel detail of

Spirit of the Revolution

Frederick Stymetz Lamb

The Battle of Harlem Heights

SEPTEMBER 16, 1776

This window was commissioned by the Daughters of the Revolution to commemorate the Battle of Harlem Heights. The Battle of Harlem Heights took place during the Revolutionary War on September 16, 1776 on the northwestern portion of Manhattan Island in New York. This was George Washington’s first battlefield victory in the war.

The Battle of Harlem Heights took place a month after the Continental Army’s loss at the Battle of Long Island. Commander-In-Chief General George Washington noticed the British approaching from afar. Washington sent Lieutenant Knowlton with 150 rangers to investigate, and they fought with a group of the British rangers in the woods. Knowlton ordered a retreat when he realized that his group was outnumbered, and the British bugle horns sounded.

However, they were not calling to advance or retreat; rather, the hunting tune “Gone Away” played, which signifies a fox has been killed and the chase was over. George Washington was well known for fox-hunting at Mount Vernon, so the mocking tune motivated him to order a counterattack. This led to a satisfying victory that reinvigorated the confidence of the members of the Continental Army, especially after a pervious string of losses.  

Daughters of the Revolution

The Daughters of the Revolution of the State of New York commissioned this window. Some of the inscription was altered during the repair of the window, with the bottom panel now listing the state of Pennsylvania. However, original images of the window show New York on the inscription. Additionally, the side panel of the window features the seal of the state of New York.

The Daughters of the Revolution was an organization comprised of women with direct genealogical ties to patriots in the American Revolutionary War. Members' ancestors were directly involved in establishing independence during the War; they were officers, soldiers,

Bottom panel detail of Spirit of the Revolution

Frederick Stymetz Lamb

sailors, and other officials working in public safety.

There were both state societies and local chapters, and the organization sought to preserve their genealogy, as well as documents and records related to that period. They promoted the study and commemoration of our country's history, especially events connected to the Revolution. 

The Daughters of the Revolution was first organized in 1890 and disbanded in 1983. It was a separate organization from the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), which still exists today. 

The Full Window

Spirit of the Revolution

Spirit of the Revolution

Frederick Stymetz Lamb

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